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Sunday, April 16, 2006

Let’s Janken!

“Janken” is the name of “Rock Paper Scissors” in Japanese. Japanese often use Janken to decide something first in daily life.

In Japan, “Rock” (shaping one hand either into a fist) is “Guu (グー)”, “Scissors” (peace sign) is “Choki (チョキ)”, and “Paper” (opening your hand) is “Paa(パー)” in Japanese. “Guu” wins “Choki”, “Choki” winds “Paa”, and “Paa” wins “Guu”. When people start Janken, they say “Janken-pon (じゃんけんポン)” together to get timing.



Do you have Janken in your country?

*I forgot to mention "Aiko" in Janken which means "being even or ending in a tie" in Japanese. If you Janken with someone and resulted in even, you start Janken again saying "Aiko-de-sho!"

10 comments:

SKIPNKAI said...

じゃんけんって地域によってやり方や呼び方(掛け声?)が違いますよね?秋田はそんな事無いのかな?”グーチーパー”とか”じゃらケツホイ”とか、、。日本全国違うと聞いた事があります。私達は”グーパージャス”でしたね~。”ジャス”が何を指すのか解りませんけどね。笑。皆さんの所はどうなんでしょう?

Fabi said...

Yeah, we have this game here, too.
It's called "Schere, Stein, Papier" in Germany.

Schere = Cutter
Stein = Stone / Rock
Papier = Paper

Cutter beats Paper, Paper beats Stone, Stone beats Cutter.

Chiara said...

Haha, I often see people doing Janken in shows like Hey!Hey!Hey!, Utaban etc. when they're about to play one of their weird games! But I never really understood what they were saying there, so thank you for this helpful explanation! ^_^

In addition to Fabi's comment: sometimes we have a 4th possibility (which is Brunnen / well) which can only be beaten by paper (as paper swims on water).
But this option is up to those who play that game.

Jeremie said...

Same game in France ^^ It's "Pierre, feuille, ciseaux"

Pierre = Rock
Feuille = Paper
Ciseaux = Scissors

We also have in France a version with well. But it's not fair: in this version well (wins against rock and scissors) and paper (wins against well and rock) are stronger than rock (wins only against scissors) and scissors (wins only against paper). So I don't like this version ^^

IZ Reloaded said...

In Singapore, it's Scissors, Paper, Stone while in Australia it's Rock, Paper, Scissors.

kayanon said...

skipnkaiさん>
不思議と家の町には特別な掛け声はありません。(たぶん”じゃんけんほい!”くらいかなぁ?)。

地域によって相当違うみたいですね。家のじいちゃんとかはいまだに昔のチョキを出します 笑。

kayanon said...

fabi>
German Janken seems to be quite similar with Japanese one.

Do you have any special saying when you start Janken like "Janken-pon" in Japanese?

kayanon said...

chiara>
You may have lots of chances to see Janken on Japanese TV. (By the way, you seem to know well about Japanese TV shows.)

It is interesting that you have 4th possibility!! Actually, we have the similar one in Japan, but it is seldom used and considered as kind of cheeting because its shape shows every 3 things together; Guu, Choki, and Paa. (bending your little finger and engage finger, and open the other fingers.)

kayanon said...

Jeremie>
Wow, it is nice to know Germany, France, and Japan has special Janken!

As I said on the above comment, there is another way to win in the Janken which doesn' make sence at all though. Children use it for fun.

kayanon said...

iz reloaded>

Hi, iz! It is slightly different from coutry to country how to call Janken. In Japan, "Guu, Choki, Paa", so "Stone, Scissors, Paper."